Case Studies

ROLE PLAYING SIMULATION (RPS) at US Army War College
Role Playing Simulations endeavor to provide the USAWC student with the ability to experience the roles, challenges, decisions, and relationships involved in a particular situation in an asynchronous environment which provides sufficient time for reflection, consideration, and engagement throughout the course of the particular role playing simulation scenario and course objectives.

A predictable world …..why would you ever choose it? by Kate Fannon
Role-play finds its place within constructivist learning theory. Constructivism relies on cognitive disequilibrium as the learners construct their meanings in an ill-defined scenario, and in the process must reconstruct their existing schema or mental models. Role-play allows each participant to make their own decisions based on their values and research, and also to be confronted with negative responses from others – and negative outcomes in terms of their goals, just as in any work-world reality.

Model GATT: A Role-Playing Simulation Course by Pamela E. Lowry
In this article, the author describes a role-playing exercise that she used as the central focus of an international economics seminar. Although the specific topic of this simulation (GATT negotiations) may be of limited interest, the procedural framework could be applied to a variety of topics, particularly in international economics.

NEW ARCTIC AIR CRASH AFTERMATH ROLE-PLAY SIMULATION.: ORCHESTRATING A FUNDAMENTAL SURPRISE by Emily S. Patterson, Richard I. Cook, David D. Woods & Marta L. Render
an aviation scenario-based role-play simulation used to teach healthcare practitioners about barriers to learning from accidents. Participants searched for the causes of the crash in a scenario that encouraged a ¡§garden path¡¨ explanation that the root cause was a risky decision to take off despite visible ice on the wings.

Rim Sim: A Role-Play Simulation by Robert C. Barrett, Suzanne L. Frew, David G. Howell, Herman A. Karl, and Emily B. Rudin
Rim Sim is a 6-hour, eight-party negotiation that focuses on creating a framework for the long-term disaster-recovery efforts. It involves a range of players from five countries affected by two natural disasters: a typhoon about a year ago and an earthquake about 6 months ago. The players are members of an International Disaster Working Group (IDWG) that has been created by an international commission. The IDWG has been charged with drawing up a framework for managing two issues: the reconstruction of regionally significant infrastructure and the design of a mechanism for allocating funding to each country for reconstruction of local infrastructure and ongoing humanitarian needs. The first issue will involve making choices among five options (two harbor options, two airport options, and one rail-line option), each of which will have three levels at which to rebuild. The second issue will involve five starting-point options. Participants are encouraged to invent other options for both issues.
This link guides you to the website where more material can be found.

Mekong eSim: A role-play/simulation project for 2nd year Environmental Engineering students byHolger Maier
The Mekong eSim was developed as a realistic international problem which emphasised collaboration and cooperation. The design of the simulation also enabled staff to integrate their own interests in environmental problems and international development issues in the classroom, and to explore the use of groupwork.

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